at times even a clear-cut meaning may slip through

She (Szymborska) is preoccupied … throughout her work, with the relationship between poetry and the daily life that surrounds it, feeds it, and at times altogether ignores it. – Clare Cavanagh Yesterday I got this challenging question regarding Szymborska: “How does the writing–or reading, affect you?” I’m still pondering about it. Sometimes art hits you somewhere behind…

LOVE AT THIRTY-TWO DEGREES

 Mary Oliver says: – to write well it is entirely necessary to read widely & deeply. Good poems are the best teachers. Perhaps they are the only teachers. If one must make a choice between reading or taking part in a workshop, on should read. Today I read this: LOVE AT THIRTY-TWO DEGREES excerpt  …

Radial Symmetry

Today I’m reading Katherine Larson, it’s an extraordinary experience! The first poem in her collection is called Statuary, it goes like this: . The late cranes throwing their necks to the wind stay somewhere between the place that rain begins and the place that it ends they seem to exist just there above the horizon…

A Thousand Mornings

There’s something about the ocean – Mary Oliver (b. 1935) I have just recently posted the two ocean-poems; “Any fool can get into an ocean” & “Thing Language” by Jack Spicer. Today I’ve viewed the ocean from a new perspective, through the eyes of Mary Oliver in her wonderful new book of poems called A Thousand Mornings….

My Vocabulary Did This to Me

The ground still squirming. The ground still not fixed as I thought it would be in an adult world. – Jack Spicer This is what I will do today; I will try to find a way, a path, an opening … into the work of Jack Spicer. It seems like the most important assignment, I’m not yet sure why,…

“Any fool can get into an ocean . . .”

Remember the Faulkner saying I quoted some days ago: “In writing, you must kill all your darlings”… Here is an interesting continuation: From his 1957 book After Lorca onward, the American poet Jack Spicer (1925-65) wrote what he described as “dictated” poetry. For Spicer, the poet acts as a receptive host for language, rather than as an agent of…

Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird

BY WALLACE STEVENS I Among twenty snowy mountains,    The only moving thing    Was the eye of the blackbird.      II I was of three minds,    Like a tree    In which there are three blackbirds.      III The blackbird whirled in the autumn winds.    It was a small part of the pantomime.      IV A man…

We stumble – We fall – We fail –

– And so desire to progress, to become better poets, to eradicate a disease, to become better people, to perfect that which is perpetually imperfect. On Fear by Mary Ruefle  

Perfect Reader

A week ago I made a post on Mary Ruefle – here she is again: I spend all day in my office, reading a poem by Stevens, pretending I wrote it myself, which is what happens when someone is lonely and decides to go shopping and meets another customer and they buy the same thing. But I come to…