Tag: Plato

Ars Poetica II

Originally posted on sub rosa:
Still soaked in the world of Anne Carson In ESSAY ON WHAT I THINK ABOUT MOST Carson dicuss the concept of ERROR (which is what she thinks about most) through a poem by the ancient Greek poet Alkman:  (…) There are three things I like about Alkman’s poem. (…) The…

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Apropos voice

Grappling with Jacques Rancière, trying to get a grip on the concept of the “ethical regime of art”; in which artistic images are evaluated in terms of their utility to society. This is linked by Rancière with Plato’s banishment of painters from his ideal community. Rancière associates this “regime” with the antique idea that defines artwork…

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The Geology of Norway:

I’m still reading Zwicky. There are no words to describe how heartbreakingly beautiful her poetry is, but here is an excerpt from The Geology of Norway, just to give you an idea – a sense of her voice: . The afternoon blue light in the fjord. Did I tell you I can understand the villagers? Being, I have…

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Lovely Blueness

Just the other day Jim Elkins made me aware of a very fine text on blue written by Colm Tóibín.  In 2004 Colm Tóibín curated an exhibition at the Chester Beatty Library in Dublin called ‘Blue’ which consisted of blue objects from the collection. The following passages are derived from In Lovely Blueness: Adventures in Troubled Light, Tóibín’s introductory essay to…

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Hi Plato, look at this!

Still soaked in the world of Anne Carson In ESSAY ON WHAT I THINK ABOUT MOST Carson dicuss the concept of ERROR (which is what she thinks about most) through a poem by the ancient Greek poet Alkman:  (…) There are three things I like about Alkman’s poem. (…) The fourth thing I like About…

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The Bell

A long time ago I read the opening of Iris Murdoch’s novel The Sea, The Sea (1978), but something happened, and the book disappeared – or I did – before I came to the end of it. The Bell (1958), which I have just put down, is therefore the first book by Murdoch that I have…

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