Running in circles …

… or maybe not? The circle in shape of a vessel resembling a Moon Jar has shown up in several of my recent paintings Moon Jars were originally made during the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). They are curvaceous, plain white porcelain jars resembling a full moon. They were made customarily to contain flowers or wine, but…

On the shape of things

“I am interested in the shape of ideas, even if I do not believe in them” —Samuel Beckett

Notes for a new week

I have this praxis of writing morning pages (the Julia Cameron way). I have done them on and off for many years. I do them first thing in the morning. I write by hand in a room lit only by candles (– this to try to fool my inner critic to believe I’m still sleeping…

A brief note on living –

The Well of Grief David Whyte Those who will not slip beneaththe still surface on the well of grief, turning down through its black waterto the place we cannot breathe, will never know the source from which we drink,the secret water, cold and clear, nor find in the darkness glimmering, the small round coins,thrown by…

Life?!

I found this wonderful little piece at Austin Kleon’ blog. It illustrate a problem I have been contemplating for as long as I can remember – never quite understanding how we came to live like this …

“We have no art. We do everything as well as we can.”

She probably wouldn’t like me saying this, but there is something almost otherworldly about Corita Kent. Corita Kent (1918–1986) was an artist, educator, and advocate for social justice. At age 18 she entered the religious order Immaculate Heart of Mary, eventually teaching in and then heading up the art department at Immaculate Heart College. Her…

Sorting out

– finishing up (tidying by reading, part 1) Moving my library, I became aware of quite a few half-read books laying around. I have started sorting them out — some are too bad, vexatious or tedious to be read, but most of them had just been misplaced or forgotten in the middle of things… And…

An individual human existence should be like a river —

— advice for days to come: The best way to overcome the fear of death—so at least it seems to me—is to make your interests gradually wider and more impersonal, until bit by bit the walls of the ego recede, and your life becomes increasingly merged in the universal life. An individual human existence should…

Notes on Melancholy, part 4

In my first note on melancholy I quoted the following question raised by Jacky Bowring, she asked: How can things that are sorrowful be beautiful? Louise Glück’s First Snow is not a theoretical answer, but a wonderful demonstration of something deeply sorrowful becoming almost unbearably beautiful – First Snow  by Louise Glück  Like a child, the earth’s going to…