Finally some good news:

I’d like to think I can represent all those artists who heroically have kept going and are successful, but are not recognised or acclaimed. —Phyllida Barlow Can it be true, as some say: Old women are replacing young men in the art world  We can at least hope! After having been overlooked for decades, the…

Women’s History Month

Thank you Sherry Wiggins, for reminding me about the great work of Valie Export Body Configurations by Valie Export (1972-76) Arrangements of the body’s elements are postures, revelations, or expressions of inner states: At present I am mainly treating female postures from a feminist point of view and dealing with materials from the female environment, in…

Visual notes on Helena Almeida

Originally posted on sherrywigginsblog:
above left: Helena Almeida, Pintura Habitada, 1977 above right: Sherry Wiggins, “test” not painted blue yet, 2015 The above image of Helena Almeida’s work from 1977 on the left is shown with an image that was taken of me in my studio in Boulder just before I left (that I have…

To make an aesthetic judgment

Further musings on Fear & Anxiety  The other day, while stumbling around in my research on anxiety & fear, I came across Sianne Ngai. Her studies of (& writings on) minor feelings is absolutely great! Her thoughts are very provocative to me as an art critic (that is to me as a person trying to make…

eyes wide open

You know by now that I’m not planning a thorough theoretical study of beauty, my intention is rather to take a stroll into the maze – hoping for a glimpse of beauty, expecting nothing. I’m a vagabond, preferring to get lost.  But, obviously, my way might not be the only way … (!), there is…

a short note on gender:

Ancient cave paintings are often understood as the first kind of art made by humans. The exact purpose of the paleolithic cave paintings is not known. Evidence suggests that they were not merely decorations of living areas, since the caves in which they have been found do not have signs of ongoing habitation. They are also often…

… we a world of accountants

I’ve told you before, but it’s well worth repeating: Lisa Carver’s Reconsidering Yoko Ono, it’s a marvelous book. Carver’s book isn’t a traditional work of art history, or an artist monograph; it seems rather to touch upon the soul of Ono’s life-long project. Carver’s style is essayistic and free, her work a body of inspired…

A Sorrow Beyond Dreams

SHORT VERSION: Peter Handke’s A Sorrow Beyond Dreams (Wunschloses Unglück) is a stroke of genius! LONGER: A Sorrow Beyond Dreams is a short story about the suicide of a poor, sad and disillusioned Austrian woman who happened also to be Peter Handke’s mother. The book was written in 1972, shortly after the woman’s death. This…

Men are all brothers … ?!

Yesterday I read a bit about Oulipo. While reading I discovered this beautifully arranged picture of a part of the group, but couldn’t help noticing that there weren’t any women around … (I am, after all, on a quest  for literary foremothers). In A Room of One’s Own Virginia Woolf writes: “we think back through our mothers…

To look one’s age

I went to see the The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel at the movies yesterday. It’s not an outstanding film, its entertaining, but not exceptional in any ways – other than this; the characters actually looks their age. Look at Judy Dench: isn’t she beautiful?! Wouldn’t it just be fantastic if young girls, women and old…

The Voyage Out

Inspired by Caroline’s beautiful review I’ve started reading Virginia Woolf’s first published novel: The Voyage Out (1915). Throughout The Voyage Out, writes Suzanne Raitt in The Cambridge Companion, Rachel (the heroine of the story) fights, just like Virginia Woolf herself, to develop a voice to which people will listen: Each of the ladies, being after the fashion of…