Notes on Melancholy, part 4

In my first note on melancholy I quoted the following question raised by Jacky Bowring, she asked: How can things that are sorrowful be beautiful? Louise Glück’s First Snow is not a theoretical answer, but a wonderful demonstration of something deeply sorrowful becoming almost unbearably beautiful – First Snow  by Louise Glück  Like a child, the earth’s going to … More Notes on Melancholy, part 4

A note on compulsive performativity – and how to care (for) more

Thoughts excerpted from Jan Verwoert’s text: I CAN, I CAN’T, WHO CARES (2008) Some have said that we have come to inhabit the post-industrial condition. But what could that mean? After the disappearance of factory work from the lives of most people in the Western world, we have entered into a culture where we do no … More A note on compulsive performativity – and how to care (for) more

Ars Poetica XI: A work of art is always part person

from: MY LOUISE BOURGEOIS SIRI HUSTVEDT ON THE COMPLEX, BRILLIANT, CONTRADICTORY ARTIST … we do not treat artworks the way we treat forks or chairs.[…] because it carries the traces of a living consciousness and unconsciousness, and it is invested with that being’s vitality. A work of art is always part person. Therefore the experience … More Ars Poetica XI: A work of art is always part person

Leaving home

As some of you might remember, I am very interested in the work of the Korean artist Do Ho Suh. Not only is it very beautiful, it also explores themes which I myself spend a lot of time thinking about; it has to do with house & home, space & place – what does it mean … More Leaving home

Art on art

When your head gets filled with too much theory – try art: A SHORT TALK ON THE END What is the difference between light and lighting? There is an etching called The Three Crosses by Rembrandt. It is a picture of the earth and the sky and Calvary. A moment rains down on them. The … More Art on art

Better to be afraid of something than of nothing …

Further musings on Edmund de Waal’s exhibition During the Night at Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna Edmund de Waal,  Albrecht Dürer, Samuel Beckett & the concept of Angst A man (Albrecht Dürer) awakes from a nightmare in the depths of the night. He writes down his fears and illustrates them with a painting. 500 years later, another man (Edmund de Waal) is inspired … More Better to be afraid of something than of nothing …

Ars Poetica VI – stanza

(or: how to set up a perfect exhibition) It seems to me that poetic theory is very often also is relevant for visual aesthetics. See for example the concept of stanza, which actually originates from the Italian: room, station, stopping-place, halting place, from Vulgar Latin stantia – station, from Latin stāre to stand: STANCE.  in poetry stanza is – according to … More Ars Poetica VI – stanza