A note on compulsive performativity – and how to care (for) more

Thoughts excerpted from Jan Verwoert’s text: I CAN, I CAN’T, WHO CARES (2008) Some have said that we have come to inhabit the post-industrial condition. But what could that mean? After the disappearance of factory work from the lives of most people in the Western world, we have entered into a culture where we do no … More A note on compulsive performativity – and how to care (for) more

Ars Poetica XI: A work of art is always part person

from: MY LOUISE BOURGEOIS SIRI HUSTVEDT ON THE COMPLEX, BRILLIANT, CONTRADICTORY ARTIST … we do not treat artworks the way we treat forks or chairs.[…] because it carries the traces of a living consciousness and unconsciousness, and it is invested with that being’s vitality. A work of art is always part person. Therefore the experience … More Ars Poetica XI: A work of art is always part person

Ars Poetica IX (You must seek your central rhythm in order to find out who you are)

I dream of an art so transparent that you can look through and see the world.   From “Reflections” by Stanley Kunitz: Years ago I came to the realization that the most poignant of all lyric tensions stems from the awareness that we are living & dying at once. To embrace such knowledge and yet … More Ars Poetica IX (You must seek your central rhythm in order to find out who you are)

Ars Poetica VII

From Mary Oliver: “My Friend Walt Whitman” … I learned from Whitman that the poem is a temple—or a green field—a place to enter, and in which to feel. Only in a secondary way is it an intellectual thing—an artifact, a moment of seemly and robust wordiness—wonderful as that part of it is. I learned … More Ars Poetica VII

Ars Poetica VI – stanza

(or: how to set up a perfect exhibition) It seems to me that poetic theory is very often also is relevant for visual aesthetics. See for example the concept of stanza, which actually originates from the Italian: room, station, stopping-place, halting place, from Vulgar Latin stantia – station, from Latin stāre to stand: STANCE.  in poetry stanza is – according to … More Ars Poetica VI – stanza

The Two Survivals

Ars Poetica V (personal lyric, cont.) Gregory Orr writes: Survival no. 1 The difference between a lyric poet and a person who does not write poems is that the poet has an arena in which to focus his/her encounter with disorder. Every encounter with disorder of any sort that results in a poem is a successful … More The Two Survivals