A note on compulsive performativity – and how to care (for) more

Thoughts excerpted from Jan Verwoert’s text: I CAN, I CAN’T, WHO CARES (2008) Some have said that we have come to inhabit the post-industrial condition. But what could that mean? After the disappearance of factory work from the lives of most people in the Western world, we have entered into a culture where we do no … More A note on compulsive performativity – and how to care (for) more

Ars Poetica XI: A work of art is always part person

from: MY LOUISE BOURGEOIS SIRI HUSTVEDT ON THE COMPLEX, BRILLIANT, CONTRADICTORY ARTIST … we do not treat artworks the way we treat forks or chairs.[…] because it carries the traces of a living consciousness and unconsciousness, and it is invested with that being’s vitality. A work of art is always part person. Therefore the experience … More Ars Poetica XI: A work of art is always part person

Ars Poetica IX (You must seek your central rhythm in order to find out who you are)

I dream of an art so transparent that you can look through and see the world.   From “Reflections” by Stanley Kunitz: Years ago I came to the realization that the most poignant of all lyric tensions stems from the awareness that we are living & dying at once. To embrace such knowledge and yet … More Ars Poetica IX (You must seek your central rhythm in order to find out who you are)

Ars Poetica VII

From Mary Oliver: “My Friend Walt Whitman” … I learned from Whitman that the poem is a temple—or a green field—a place to enter, and in which to feel. Only in a secondary way is it an intellectual thing—an artifact, a moment of seemly and robust wordiness—wonderful as that part of it is. I learned … More Ars Poetica VII